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Artist Profiles

Artist Profiles - Guitarist Jeff Golub

Jeff Golub was a jazz guitarist. Golub had 12 solo albums and three CDs as the leader of the instrumental band, Avenue Blue. Before becoming an instrumentalist, Golub worked as a sideman to a number of successful rock and pop artists.

Golub was born in April 15, 1955 in Copley, Ohio, outside of Akron. Golub started playing by emulating 1960s blues rock guitarists. Golub was in his teens when he first heard a Wes Montgomery record. This moment set him on a whole new course which...

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The new Netflix movie Come Sunday stars the English actor Chiwetel Ejiofor as an American leader of an evangelical megachurch who experiences a theological crisis — one that costs him his ministry.

In an interview, he said that his approach to adapting the real-life tale of Bishop Carlton Pearson came from "this idea of how one organizes one's thoughts in terms of a belief structure."

The current furor over the Brooklyn Museum's appointment of a white woman to oversee the museum's African art collection is not surprising or infuriating to Steven Nelson. Nelson is an African-American art historian at UCLA who specializes in African art, and he says, "There are very few of us in the field."

There's a sequence in the documentary Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami that follows the pop-art icon before, during, and after a pre-recorded TV performance she's giving in front of a studio audience in France. As she makes her way toward the stage in a black corset, high heels, and a lacy purple headdress that masks her eyes — an amusing contrast with the lumpen roadies and stagehands she greets along the way — Jones frets about the possibility of the set being tacky.

Washington, D.C. was the first majority-black city in the U.S. and it stayed that way for decades, from 1970 to 2015. Now the African-American population in the nation’s capital is somewhere around 48 percent, according to the latest Census data.

'Rampage' Lowers The Bar On Razing A City

Apr 11, 2018

Nearly four months have elapsed since the release of Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle, the latest two-titled PG-13 blockbuster headlined by Dwayne Johnson. The subject a of recent, glowing Rolling Stone profile that revealed he did not vote in 2016 but does not rule out running for the nation's swole-est office in the future, Johnson has somehow become America's most precious natural resource and its most abundant.

Yvonne Staples, a member of the renowned soul, gospel and R&B group The Staple Singers, died Tuesday in Chicago at the age of 80, representatives for her sister and band mate Mavis Staples confirmed to NPR Music. No cause was given, and the Staples family has yet to issue a statement.

"Stolen Moments," the latest single from nascent Brooklyn poly-instrumentalist and singer Cautious Clay (neé Josh Karpeh), is a stunning, hushed lament that plays out like a lovers' quarrel about commitment (or lack thereof) that's still reeling long after the last words have been thrown.

The livestream has concluded.

Every year since 1982, the National Endowment For the Arts has inducted a new class of NEA Jazz Masters, honoring lifetime achievement across a broad range of personalities and backgrounds. The 2018 class is no exception, as we'll see during a tribute concert at the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C. next Monday, which will be streamed live on this page.

When Melanie McNeil roused her 8-year-old great-grandson, Byron Ridenour-Wright, out of bed in Ohio last fall, and loaded him onto a bus bound for the National Museum of African American History and Culture, she didn't have high hopes for lunch.

America has had its first black baseball player, its first black astronaut, its first black president — but after the firsts, the world is still full of onlies. Sometimes the only-ness is existential — like the only black student in a private school. Sometimes it's incidental — the only black woman in an hour-long yoga class.

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April is Jazz Appreciation Month

Fridays at Noon

"The Soul of Jazz" combines the best in classic and contemporary soul/jazz, international rhythms, dance music and other genre-bending styles with host Jamal Ahmed.

Fridays at 5:30 PM

WCSU Presents African American Sports Legends

Veteran sports broadcaster Lenny Moon invites African-American sports professionals to tell their stories, their challenges, their triumphs & their defeats.

Mondays/Wednesdays/Fridays at 6 PM and Saturdays at 9 AM

Déjà vu With Turk Logan

Dr. John ‘Turk’ Logan hosts "Déjà vu," a new three-hour long program with a mixture of Urban/Jazz music.

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