WCSU

Artist Profiles

Artist Profiles - Guitarist Wayman Tisdale

Wayman Lawrence Tisdale was a jazz bass guitarist and professional basketball player in the NBA. Tisdale was born in Fort Worth, Texas on June 9, 1964. He was one of the most heavily-recruited basketball players in the country. While at the University of Oklahoma from 1982 to 1985, he was a three-time Big Eight Conference Player of the Year. The Indiana Pacers made Tisdale the second overall pick in the 1985 NBA Draft.

Tisdale launched his music career with “Power Forward” in...

Read More

Jordan Peele used to be half of the comedy duo Key & Peele, with his partner Keegan-Michael Key. (You may remember Peele as the calm President Obama who needed an Anger Translator). His most recent project is the horror film Get Out, which he wrote, produced and directed.

We've invited Peele to play a game called "Eh-oh, eh-oh": Three questions about the children's TV show Teletubbies, which marks is 20th anniversary this month.

Writing Past The White Gaze As A Black Author

Mar 4, 2017

When I started writing stories four years ago, I knew, in a very vague but urgent way that I wanted to tell "my story," or at least the stories that were important to me: stories about the people I knew and loved, black and brown people, first-generation kids and our parents, poor people and working-class people and barely-middle class people trying to find meaning and connection and comfort.

Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson has been confirmed as the secretary of Housing and Urban Development, by a 58-41 Senate vote.

Six Democrats and one Independent joined with the Republicans to approve the nomination — mostly Democrats who are up for re-election next year and represent states that voted for President Trump, NPR's Arnie Seipel reports.

"Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, who received blowback from liberals for voting for Carson in committee, voted against his nomination today," Arnie says.

In a new book, The Complacent Class, economist Tyler Cowen argues that the United States is standing still.

People have grown more risk averse and are reluctant to switch jobs or move to another state, he says, and the desire to innovate — to grow and change — has gone away.

In an interview with NPR's Rachel Martin, Cowen says he's worried that more and more communities are self-segregating — by income, education or race.

They're simply an abundance of euphoria. The Dirty Dozen Brass Band blasted the Tiny Desk with a Sousaphone, trumpets, saxophones, guitar and drums, at stunning volume, for a joyful celebration.

This band has been mixing be-bop and funk for 40 years. Around this time of year, when Mardi Gras revelry is fueled by New Orleans jazz, it was so good to feel their sounds in the office. Since today is Fat Tuesday — just before Lent and its fasts begin for some — we are sharing the party we hosted, filled with brass and sass from this fixture of great American music. Enjoy.

Harvard historian Caroline Light grew up with guns. Her family lived in Southwestern Virginia, and her parents regularly enjoyed hunting and shooting skeet (clay targets). They used guns on a recreational basis, not for what Light calls "do-it-yourself self-defense."

It's been five years since the death of Trayvon Martin — and the outrage that sparked the Black Lives Matter movement.

Martin — 17 years old, black and unarmed — was shot by George Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer in Sanford, Fla.

Mahershala Ali won the Academy Award for best supporting actor for his role in Moonlight. NPR's Kelly McEvers spoke to Ali in October about his experience working on the film, which won the Oscar for best picture. This story originally aired on Oct. 21, 2016 on All Things Considered.

Songs We Love: Harriet Tubman, 'Blacktal Fractal'

Feb 27, 2017

To mark the end of Black History Month, it is only fitting to feature a song by an ultramodern band called Harriet Tubman, named after the celebrated abolitionist and activist who led hundreds of slaves to freedom via the Underground Railroad. Tubman's birth name, Araminta, provides a suitable title for the band's latest album, which dropped Friday.

Tales of talented black students on majority-white campuses running through a racial gauntlet that has them questioning their brilliance, abilities and place are familiar to parents like me who have a college-bound child at home.

Pages

Tune in for Biz Talk With Josh Smith Saturdays At 8 AM

Josh speaks about the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development & Special Secretary of Office of Minority Affairs.

Keep WCSU wherever you go. Download the WCSU Public Radio App. The WCSU Public Radio App allows you to conveniently listen to your favorite jazz and news programs on your favorite mobile device.

Tony Marcel Chappel - Operations Manager

Robert Trent Newell - Broadcast Support Services Manager

Stephon Lane - Broadcast Technician Manager

Utsey T. Shelton - Marketing Assistant

Board Of Trustees