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Artist Profiles

Artist Profiles - Vocalist Abbey Lincoln

Anna Marie Wooldridge, better known by her stage name Abbey Lincoln, was a jazz vocalist, songwriter and actress. Lincoln was unusual in that she wrote and performed her own compositions, expanding the expectations of jazz audiences.

Born in Chicago, Illinois on August, 1930, she was one of many singers influenced by Billie Holiday. She often could be found at the Blue Note in New York City. In, 1964, Lincoln co-starred with Ivan Dixon in "Nothing But a Man," an independent film...

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Superfly Photos From A Late, Great Master

Dec 30, 2017

Flared-leg pants, oversized glasses and hats. Unflinchingly proud expressions. Groovy dance moves.

This was the youth culture of 1960s and 1970s Bamako, the capital city of Mali. And it was captured by Malian photographer Malick Sidibe, bringing international recognition and big deal awards. And it's being celebrated in the first major posthumous exhibit of his images, "Malick Sidibe: Mali Twist," which is at the Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain In Paris through February 25. Sidibe died in April 2016 at age 80.

In Memoriam 2017: The Musicians We Lost

Dec 29, 2017

Bright voices from every corner of the music world left us this year — from virtuoso players to visionary composers, from charismatic bandleaders to golden-eared producers, from influential inventors to critics and commentators who interrogated and elevated the art they covered. Explore their legacies here.


Nat Hentoff

June 10, 1925 Jan. 7, 2017

Wayne Shorter didn't release any new music in 2017. But that's not to say the eminent saxophonist, composer and NEA Jazz Master had anything less than a banner year. In the spring he returned to Newark, for the first time in ages, as the honored guest of a festival at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center.

5 R&B Albums You Slept On In 2017

Dec 28, 2017

At 22, Brent Faiyaz is Grammy-nominated for singing the bouncy hook to GoldLink's summer-defining "Crew," a D.C.-centric celebration of being alive and young, black and striving. It's about the bond shared with people who've been there from the beginning.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NOEL KING, HOST:

2017 was a great year for Latino popular culture and the arts. There was the hit song "Despacito" by Puerto Ricans Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "DESPACITO")

Slingshot artist Jamila Woods developed a love for spoken word poetry while still in high school in Chicago. While she always sang in vocal groups and choirs, she didn't consider making music of her own until after she returned home from Brown University, where she majored in Africana Studies and Theatre and Performance Studies. Now with her debut album, HEAVN, it's easy to see how her music is a natural extension of that background.

The world lost a lot of notable people this year, and it feels as if they're departing even more quickly as the year runs out. Activist/humanitarian Dick Gregory, actress/singer Della Reese, musicians Fats Domino, Al Jarreau, Geri Allen and Dave Valentin were all well-known names. So was journalist Roger Wilkins.

And so at year's end we've compiled our own Code Switch list. It's not comprehensive; instead, we wanted to spotlight some of the people we might not have known as well, and share them with you.

Erica Garner, a 27-year-old activist whose father's dying words became a rallying cry for protest against police brutality, has been hospitalized in serious condition after a heart attack, according to multiple reports.

Eric Garner, a black man who died in 2014 after a white NYPD officer put him in a chokehold, was recorded repeatedly telling the officer, "I can't breathe." A grand jury did not indict any officers over his death, a decision that prompted protests across the country.

In a year of anti-refugee sentiment in many corners of the world (and especially in the U.S.), one former refugee and first-time candidate ran for office — and won.

Twenty-three years before Wilmot Collins became the mayor-elect of Helena, Mont., he was a refugee from Liberia. He stood in a long line at the port of Monrovia, Liberia, waiting for a cargo vessel to carry him away from the country's civil war.

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Dr. John ‘Turk’ Logan hosts "Déjà vu," a new three-hour long program with a mixture of Urban/Jazz music.

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