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Artist Profiles

Artist Profiles - Drummer Lenny White

Lenny White is a jazz fusion drummer. He was born in New York City on December 19, 1949 and is best known for being the drummer of Chick Corea's Return to Forever. A resident of Teaneck, New Jersey, White has been described as "one of the founding fathers of jazz fusion". He taught himself how to play the drums and collaborated with Miles Davis on Davis’ “Bitches Brew” in 1969. Lenny also performed with trumpeter Freddie Hubbard’s album, “Red Clay” in 1970 along with Herbie Hancock, Joe...

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Larry Coryell, the jazz guitarist known as the "Godfather of Fusion," died Sunday night at a hotel in New York City, according to his publicist. He was 73.

Coryell was still performing more than 50 years after his first recordings. He played at New York jazz club Iridium on Friday and Saturday nights, and had plans for a summer tour with his fusion group The Eleventh House.

If you are a fan of sketch comedy, then you'd probably know the name Jordan Peele. He, along with Keegan Michael Key wrote and performed in the acclaimed Comedy Central sketch series Key & Peele. The show, which ran for five seasons, earned a Peabody Award and two Primetime Emmys for its hilarious and deeply pointed take on race and culture.

A popular feature among the sketches on Key & Peele was the way it sometimes mixed humor and horror, for example, the zombies who refused to eat black people.

Clyde Stubblefield, the funk drummer whose work with James Brown made him one of the most sampled musicians in history, died Saturday morning in Madison, Wis., his publicist confirmed. Stubblefield was 73; his publicist did not provide a cause of death.

Walter "Junie" Morrison, a member of the funk group The Ohio Players, died February 16. Morrison joined the band in the early 70's as a keyboardist, producer and singer. He was involved in some of The Ohio Players' major hits and the albums “Pain,” “Pleasure,” and “Ecstasy.” He was largely responsible for writing and arranging the band's 1974 hit single, "Funky Worm.”

In the recent film, Moonlight, Mahershala Ali plays an unlikely father figure to a quiet young African-American boy named Chiron. At school, Chiron is bullied. At home, he is neglected by a mother who is addicted to crack. Ali's character, Juan, is a drug dealer who takes Chiron under his wing in an attempt to provide him with some stability.

Ali, whose performance earned him an Oscar nomination for best supporting actor, tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that he knew men like Juan growing up.

"It is not an accident that there is a blackout on the Black man's contributions in America."
Dr. Melvin Chapman (1928-2015), educator, Detroit, Mich.

Beyoncé is no one's mammy.

So the record-scratching comments from Adele and Faith Hill shortly after Beyoncé's Grammy performance came across as absolutely bizarre. In her earnest acceptance speech for her album of the year win, Adele praised her fellow artist's vision for Lemonade, the album that Adele's 25 bested in the category. She also all but said Beyoncé deserved the Grammy.

The late James Baldwin was one of the most influential African-American writers to emerge during the civil rights era. During the late 1950s and 1960s, he traveled through the South and addressed racial issues head on.

It is a truth universally acknowledged that parsing the broader implications of The Bachelor/Bachelorette can feel an awful lot like examining the semiotics of mashed potato flakes. But can we not also agree that the fact that a narrative is ridiculous and phony doesn't mean it isn't both reflective of and influential upon the culture out of which it grows?

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Tune in to Destination Jazz - Mon-Fri At 2 PM

Tony Marcel Chappel will route your afternoons with contemporary jazz with weather & traffic updates at 2 PM.

Coming To WCSU In April

Mondays at Noon. "Catch the Flo" is a weekly music show hosted by contemporary jazz keyboard artist, Marcus Johnson.
Tuesdays at Noon. "Return to the Source" provides the presentation & insightful selections that you'd expect from a straight-ahead jazz show with Doug Turner.
Wednesdays at Noon. “The Groove,” with host Rufus Harrison, The show features contemporary jazz artists like Gerald Albright, Marion Meadows and George Benson.
Thursdays at Noon. Café Jazz is a mix of original vinyl recordings with contemporary jazz releases on CD with host Richard (Gene) Knight.
Fridays at Noon. "The Soul of Jazz" combines the best in classic and contemporary soul/jazz with host Jamal Ahmed.

Keep WCSU wherever you go. Download the WCSU Public Radio App. The WCSU Public Radio App allows you to conveniently listen to your favorite jazz and news programs on your favorite mobile device.

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